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Hardwood Furniture from Sustainable Sources




Hardwood Furniture from Sustainable Sources

Vegetable Samosas

Anybody familiar with Indian food will have seen and most probably tried samosas. This recipe is a quick and convenient way of making authentic samosa using basic constituents, some of which can be prepared in advance and used when required. For example, the spice mix, which is more convenient to prepare in a batch and store in an airtight jar.

I have tried various ways of cooking samosa and have decided that this particular method produces excellent authentic results. Some recipes use large amounts of oil in the preparation of the pastry. I don't subscribe to this as it makes the preparation extremely messy and the finished article is exceedingly greasy (and probably extremely unhealthy!).

In fact for the pastry I simply use chapattis. When fried, they form perfect samosa cases.

The distinctive flavour of the chappati is imparted by the dried fenugreek leaves. The heat in this recipe is controlled by the use of ground black pepper and chilli powder. Cut down first on the chilli powder if you do not want too a too spicy filling.

Chapattis (about 8) - See recipe for chappatis
1 kg potatoes
1 tbsp salt
500g peas (defrosted or fresh)
Plain flour & water
Vegetable oil for frying

Spice Mixture for Vegetable Samosas.

1 tspn ground black pepper
1/2 - 2 tspn chilli powder (according to taste)
1/2 tspn garam massala (homemade or bought)
2 tspn ground coriander
1 tspn ground cummin
2 tbsp dried funugreek leaves

Peel, boil and coursely mash the potatoes.

Add the spice mixture, the salt and the peas.

Make a flour and water paste using the plain flour. Mix it until it is stick, this will be the 'glue' to hold the samosa together.

Cut each chappati in half. Each half chappati will be folded into a cone, glued, filled and sealed at the top and will make 1 samosa.

To make the cone, fold one corner of the half chappati across about one third of the way. brush the folded over portion with the 'glue' on the outside and then fold the other corner of the chappati across and press together.

Open out the cone shape formed and fill with the potato, peas and spice mixture, but take care not to overfill, because the top of the cone needs to be folded over, glued and sealed.

To seal the top of the samosa, first fold onside of the rim across the top of the filling. Then brush the 'glue' onto the outside of the folded down rim. The fold down the other side and press onto the glued surface.

Put uncooked samosa to one side on kitchen towel and repeat the above process until all the chappati and filling is used up.

Deep fry the samosa in medium hot oil until golden brown on the outside. Take care not to overcook or to have the oil to hot, otherwise the pastry will burn. It is a good idea to test the temperature of the oil with a piece of the chappati casing. When it begins to bubble nicely the oil is the correct temperature.

Don't overfill the fryer. it is best to fry in comfortable batches and drain the finished samosa on kitchen towel.

Let the samosas cool slightly and serve with a small tomato, cucumber, lettuce and onion salad and some yoghurt and mint sauce.

When cool, the samosa can be refrigerated in aluminium foil or frozen.

They are OK reheated in a microwave, or else drop into hot oil to reheat. I prefer microwaving rather than refrying, just so as not to add any more oil to the samosa than necessary.

Useful Links

Recipe for Natural Yoghurt

Recipe for Yoghurt & Mint Sauce

Recipe for Chappatis

 

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